Do It Yourself

Do it yourself (DIY) is building, modifying, or repairing something without the aid of experts or professionals. The popular culture phrase “do it yourself” had come into common usage (in standard english) by the 1950s, in reference to the emergence of a trend of people undertaking home improvement and various other small craft and construction projects as both a creative-recreational and cost-saving activity.

Subsequently, the term DIY has taken on a broader meaning that covers a wide range of skill sets. DIY is associated with the international YouTube videoclip) or other types of units to take responsibility, so that they’d be able to do things themselves just as a preparation for their own future.

Home improvement

The DIY movement is a re-introduction (often to urban and suburban dwellers) of the old pattern of personal involvement and use of skills in upkeep of a house or apartment, making clothes; maintenance of cars, computers, websites; or any material aspect of living. The philosopher San Francisco Oracle) reflected a growing sentiment:

Our educational system, in its entirety, does nothing to give us any kind of material competence. In other words, we don’t learn how to cook, how to make clothes, how to build houses, how to make love, or to do any of the absolutely fundamental things of life. The whole education that we get for our children in school is entirely in terms of abstractions. It trains you to be an insurance salesman or a bureaucrat, or some kind of cerebral character.[4]

In the 1970s, DIY spread through the North American population of college- and recent-college-graduate age groups. In part, this movement involved the renovation of affordable, rundown older homes. But it also related to various projects expressing the social and environmental vision of the 1960s and early 1970s. The young visionary Whole Earth Catalog (subtitled Access to Tools) in late 1968.

The first Catalog, and its successors, used a broad definition of the term “tools”. There were informational tools, such as books (often technical in nature), professional journals, courses, classes, and the like. There were specialized, designed items, such as carpenters’ and masons’ tools, garden tools, welding equipment, chainsaws, fiberglass materials and so on; even early personal computers. The designer J. Baldwin acted as editor to include such items, writing many of the reviews. The Catalog’s publication both emerged from and spurred the great wave of experimentalism, convention-breaking, and do-it-yourself attitude of the late 1960s. Often copied, the Catalog appealed to a wide cross-section of people in North America and had a broad influence.

For decades, magazines such as Sunset Books, based upon previously published articles from their magazine, Sunset, based in California. Time-Life, Better Homes & Gardens, and other publishers soon followed suit.

In the mid-1990s, DIY home-improvement content began to find its way onto the World Wide Web. HouseNet was the earliest bulletin-board style site where users could share information. HomeTips.com, established in early 1995, was among the first Web-based sites to deliver free extensive DIY home-improvement content created by expert authors.[citation needed] Since the late 1990s, DIY has exploded on the Web through thousands of sites.

In the 1970s, when home video (Toolbelt Diva specifically caters to female DIYers.

Beyond magazines and television, the scope of home improvement DIY continues to grow online where most mainstream media outlets now have extensive DIY-focused informational websites such as This Old House, Martha Stewart, and the DIY Network. These are often extensions of their magazine or television brand. The growth of independent online DIY resources is also spiking.[5] The number of homeowners who blog about their experiences continues to grow, along with DIY websites from smaller organizations.

Subculture

The terms “DIY” and “do-it-yourself” are also used to describe:

  • alternative comics
  • Bands or solo artists releasing their music on self-funded record labels
  • Trading of mixtapes as part of cassette culture
  • Home made stuffs based on the principles of “Recycle, Reuse & Reduce” (the 3R’s). A common term in many Environmental movements encouraging people to reuse old, used objects found in their homes and to recycle simple materials like paper.[6]
  • Crafts such as knitting, sewing, handmade jewelry, ceramics[7]
  • Designing business cards, invitations and so on
  • Creating punk or indie musical merchandise through the use of recycling thrift store or discarded materials, usually decorated with art applied by silk screen.[8]
  • game modding
  • Contemporary roller derby
  • Building musical electronic circuits such as the circuit bending noise machines from old children toys.
  • Modifying (“mod’ing”) common products to allow extended or unintended uses, commonly referred to by the internet term, “life-hacking”. Related to jury-rigging i.e. sloppy/ unikely mods
  • DIY science: using open-source hardware to make scientific equipment to conduct citizen science or simply low-cost traditional science [9]
    • DIY bio

DIY as a subculture could be said to have begun with the punk movement of the 1970s.[10] Instead of traditional means of bands reaching their audiences through large music labels, bands began recording, manufacturing albums and merchandise, booking their own tours, and creating opportunities for smaller bands to get wider recognition and gain cult status through repetitive low-cost DIY touring. The burgeoning zine movement took up coverage of and promotion of the underground punk scenes, and significantly altered the way fans interacted with musicians. Zines quickly branched off from being hand-made music magazines to become more personal; they quickly became one of the youth culture’s gateways to DIY culture. This led to tutorial zines showing others how to make their own shirts, posters, zines, books, food, etc.

 

See also

  • Do-It-Yourself at Wikibooks
  • The dictionary definition of do it yourself at Wiktionary

References

  1. ^ Newsletter of the Hellenic Society of Archaeometry, N.110, May 2010, p.84
  2. ^ Ancient Building Came With DIY Instructions, Discovery News, Mon Apr 26, 2010
  3. ^ Ancient Building Comes with Assembly Instructions, (photos), Discovery News
  4. ^ Watts, Alan et al. “Houseboat Summit” in The San Francisco Oracle, issue #7. San Francisco.
  5. ^ Wall Street Journal, September 2007
  6. http://hridsmenon.wix.com/projectgreenworldinternational#!do-it-yourself
  7. ^ “DIY Network Craft Page”. http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/crafts/. Retrieved 2007-09-24.
  8. ^ “DIY guide to screen printing t-shirts for cheap”. http://www.diehippiedie.com/screwball/diyshirt.html. Retrieved 2007-09-24. “”Ever wonder where bands get their T-shirts made? Some of them probably go to the local screen printers and pay a bunch of money to have their shirts made up, then they have to turn around and sell them to you for a high price. Others go the smart route, and do it themselves. Here’s a quick how-to on the cheap way to going about making T-shirts.””
  9. ^ Pearce, Joshua M. 2012. “Building Research Equipment with Free, Open-Source Hardware.” Science 337 (6100): 1303–1304.open access
  10. ^ “Oxford Journal of Design History Webpage”. http://jdh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/19/1/69. Retrieved 2007-09-24. “”Yet, it remains within the subculture of punk music where the homemade, A4, stapled and photocopied fanzines of the late 1970s fostered the “do-it-yourself” (DIY) production techniques of cut-n-paste letterforms, photocopied and collaged images, hand-scrawled and typewritten texts, to create a recognizable graphic design aesthetic.””

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Do It Yourself, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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